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JAMAYIK

Etidyan jamayiken ka sélébré rivé a sé Zendyen-la an péyi-la.

Etidyan jamayiken ka sélébré rivé a sé Zendyen-la an péyi-la.

{«Il est important qu’en tant que peuple les Jamaïcains célèbrent l’héritage de tous les différents groupes ethniques qui contribuent à rendre la culture du pays unique. La multi-ethnicité qui constitue le paysage jamaïcain doit être célébrée. »

«It is important that as a people Jamaicans celebrate the heritage of all the different ethnic groups who contribute to the country's unique culture. The multi-ethnicity which makes up the Jamaican landscape needs to be celebrated».}

10 mai 2007

Jamaican Students celebrate Indian Arrival Day

THE Jamaica National Heritage Trust (JNHT) marked the 162nd anniversary of the arrival of the East Indians to Jamaica with a mini-expo and lecture on Thursday May 10, 2007 at its offices at Headquarters House, 79 Duke Street, Kingston.

{ {{Communications director Joan Andrea Hutchinson said it was important that as a people Jamaicans celebrate the heritage of all the different ethnic groups who contribute to the country's unique culture.}} }

According to Hutchinson, since most Jamaicans are of African descent, the concept of 'heritage' tends to be synonymous with African heritage.

But she said the multi-ethnicity which makes up the Jamaican landscape needs to be celebrated, and added that the JNHT was committed to the celebration of all the ethnic groups which have contributed to the nation.

Pandit Nathan Charma of the National Council for Indian Culture in Jamaica, in addressing the group of mostly students, said the Indians made a significant contribution to the island in many different areas.

He noted that more than 75 of the plants used in Jamaica were brought here by the Indians, as they sought to replicate aspects of their environment.

Many of these had medicinal value, while some were spices. Some of these plants were on display for visitors to see.

Meanwhile, Danesh Maragh, a member of the Indian Council, said the contribution of the Indians was evident in areas such as commerce, culture and cuisine.

Most Jamaicans, he added, have either eaten or at least are aware of roti, because it has been deeply integrated into the Jamaican cuisine by the Indians.

Indian labour, he said, helped to sustain the Jamaican economy through work on the plantations. In the area of commerce, many Indians left the estates and opened shops, sometimes with bars attached to them, he added.

According to Maragh, Hinduism, the religion of a majority of Indians, quarrels with no other religion.

{"A Hindu believes that every man strives to reach the same goal, but takes different paths to get there,"} he said.

He said, too, that cannabis sativa (ganja) was brought to Jamaica by the Indians, but noted that it was used as part of religious sacrament, and as a relaxant at the end of a day of hard work.

He said it was interesting that although the smoking of marijuana by Rastafarians was learned from the Indians, the Indians ended up trading in most cases rather than smoking and as a result did not suffer the same fate as the Rastafarians at the hands of the police.

On May 10, 1845 the first group of more than 200 East Indians landed at Old Harbour Bay in St Catherine from Northern India to work on the plantations.

Article courtesy Deosaran Bisnath

----

{{Cliquer sur les images pour les agrandir.

Dans l’ordre :}}

1. Des étudiants de Glenmuir High School examinent certains objets de l’expo organisée par le Jamaica National Heritage Trust pour marquer le 162è anniversarire de l’arrivée des Indiens à la Jamaïque le 10 mai 2007.

2. Coolies faisant la lessive. Ancienne carte postale de Jamaïque.

_ Courtesy :
_ Richard B. Cheddie
_ The Bhatchaman Indo-Caribbean Research Group.

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